Podcast #001: Why Only Humans Have Sleep Apnea

Podcast #001 Show Notes

Welcome to the relaunching of my Breathe Better, Sleep Better, Live Better podcast. In this episode, I will reveal:

1.  Why only humans have sleep apnea
2.  How you can choke and die
3.  5 simple things you can do to sleep better tonight.

Download the PDF of the slides here.
Download the MP3 file here.

Acronym for obstructive sleep apnea: MOOSE Male Older Overweight Snoring Excessive Sleepiness.

4 Evolutionary / Anatomic Changes:

1.  Klinorynchy
2.  Anterior Migration of the Foramen Magnum
3.  Laryngeal descent and loss of epiglottic and soft palate lockup
4.  Vertical descent of the larynx.

As a result of complex speech and language development, only humans can choke and die.

3 Dental Important Concepts

1.  Transition to soft, processed foods lead to dental crowding and malocclusion
2.  Eating soft vs. hard foods and aggravate dental crowding
3.  Bottle-feeding can cause dental crowding and crooked teeth.

Changes in our eating and infant feeding habits created more dental crowding and more narrow airways. All these concepts are described in more detail in my book, Sleep Interrupted: A physician reveals the #1 reason why so many of us are sick and tired.

Facial profiling. Younger people have more triangular jaws and flatter faces. If our brains get bigger and our jaws get smaller, what will we look like in 50,000 years?

Sleep-breathing continuum. All chronic health conditions can be directly or indirectly connected to poor breathing and poor sleep.

Conventional treatment options for obstructive sleep apnea:

1.  Conservative
2.  CPAP
3.  Dental appliances
4.  Surgery

Other options:

1.  Acupuncture
2.  Oral exercises
3.  Didgeridoo
4.  Provent
4.  Winx
5.  Tongue nerve stimulation / pacemaker
6.  Functional dental appliances.

5 Practical Tips to Sleep Better Today

1.  Avoid eating or drinking alcohol late
2.  Improve nasal breathing
3.  Adjust head position to improve the airway
4.  Avoid migraine triggers
5.  Practice relaxation / deep breathing techniques.

Reader Question: Dry mouth after starting CPAP. What to do?

Sleep Tip of the Day: How blue light can ruin your sleep and what you can do about it.

Resources mentioned in podcast:

Dr. Brian Palmer’s website
Dr. Weston Price: Nutrition and Physical Degeneration

Subscribe in iTunes @ doctorstevenpark.com/itunes. Thanks for reviewing my podcast and rating me.

Download the PDF of the slides.
Download the MP3 file here.

Please note: I reserve the right to delete comments that are offensive or off-topic.

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8 thoughts on “Podcast #001: Why Only Humans Have Sleep Apnea

  1. Hi Steven. Remember Patrick McKeown’s Buteyko breathing technique? Breathe LIGHTER, not deeper. Only through the nose, with the diaphragm, at a rate of 6-10 bpm, like a mouse wanting not to be noticed by the cat. Mouse breathing. That’s the way to rebalance CO2, reduce smooth muscle spasm, improve perfusion, and open the nasal passages.

    I’m looking forward to more from you….you are still leading the pack.

    Barry

  2. Thanks, Barry. I haven’t forgotten. But for some people, the nose is so blocked that you literally can’t breathe through the nose, no matter what you do. Once this is taken care of, nasal breathing can slow down breathing on its’ own, and then Buteyko can be applied more effectively.

  3. Have you or are you planning to present the anatomy of the whole complex to show the musculo-skeletal relationships from and including the skull to and including all of the suprahyoid and infrahyoid muscle attachments to illustrate the tongue position and postural relations with the total body posture implications that can and likely does show the possible source of changes in body posture and its impact over time on various joints showing osteoarthritic degeneration which microscopically appears like pressure atrophy which can result from malposition of the elliptical head of bones rotated in their sockets so the fit is not congruent between them to withstand pressure (vertical pressure of standing or sitting) over time? (quite a long sentence!)
    Will you recognize the round-the-clock impact of the anatomy associated with OSA and how this condition varies from awake (upright posture)compared to asleep (prone posture)?
    Have you reviewed the article “OSA Compensatory Head Posture Changes in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea” by TONG Maorong (Maorong Tong)?
    Are you willing to address the round-the-clock implications of what we refer to as OSA prone Jaw-tongue-throat anatomy which is not on vacation while we are awake and you, as an ENT specialist, are responsible for round-the-clock rather than limited artificially to the the pigeon-hole of “sleep medicine”?
    The current reductionism in the compartmentalization of medical research, education and practice distorts reality and is unscientific!
    How can we empower integration of the process rather than colluding with this distortion? Is it not part of our Hippocratic responsibility?
    I invite you to both personally and professionally respond to me about this!
    Arthur M. Strauss, DDS

  4. Steve, I’ve got a surprise for you. Dogs and cats have sleep apnea. It appears that brachycephalic canines and felines are at greater risk. I was told by a long time zookeeper at our Center for Life Long Learning that primates have sleep apnea. It ‘s likely that other mammals have it as well, but to my knowledge, no one has made an effort to investigate it.

  5. Mack,

    Thanks for pointing it out. Yes, I am aware that flat faced mammals such as bulldogs and pugs can have it too. However, they are the exception. Bulldogs are bred to have flat faces. All humans, on the other hand are anatomically susceptible to sleep-breathing problems because of our ability to talk, and our recent change in eating habits.

  6. Dr. Strauss,

    I completely agree with you that everything is inter-related. I’ve mentioned most of your associations in past blogs and interviews. However, this forum is geared for the lay public and not an appropriate arena to discuss these highly technical topics. Unfortunately, it’s been easier having the lay public understand and appreciate all these important concepts than trying to convince medical professionals. Dentists are definitely a few steps ahead, however.

  7. Dr. Strauss,

    I completely agree with you that everything is inter-related. I’ve mentioned most of your associations in past blogs and interviews. However, this forum is geared for the lay public and not an appropriate arena to discuss these highly technical topics. Unfortunately, it’s been easier having the lay public understand and appreciate all these important concepts than trying to convince medical professionals. Dentists are definitely a few steps ahead, however.